Bone Health

It’s never too late to improve bone health.

To be healthy, bones need two basic requirements: food and work.

Dr. Robert P. Heaney

Although bone mass peaks between age 30 to 35, it’s never too late to improve bone health. According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), good nutrition and adequate calcium and vitamin D, plus regular weight-bearing exercise can do much to slow the natural process of bone loss. Also recommended by the IOF is avoiding excess alcohol and smoking, which can reduce bone mass and increase fracture risk.

Unfortunately, many adolescents and adults do not meet current calcium or physical activity recommendations. Milk is an excellent source of calcium and a good source of other bone-building nutrients, including vitamins A and B12, protein, potassium, phosphorus, and riboflavin. In the United States, milk and some calcium-fortified juices and beverages also have added vitamin D.

Over the years, some epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of cola-type soft drinks to poorer bone heath in girls. However, clinical research confirms that soft drinks, including colas, which contain caffeine and phosphoric acid do not significantly impact calcium balance.

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